BEAT Festival 2015 Neighborhoods & Venues

BEAT is dedicated to presenting art in majestic and unusual spaces throughout the borough. We consider space a primary component of the festival’s cultural contribution. By re-purposing a diverse array of venues into performance spaces, we hope to transform non-traditional environments into spaces for truth, openness and community vitality, and to bring audiences to Brooklyn neighborhoods they may not have experienced before. Take a tour through the BEAT Festival 2015’s neighborhoods and venues…

Crown Heights

Brooklyn Museum, Weeksville Heritage Center & FiveMyles

brooklyn museum

About the Area

The central Brooklyn neighborhood of Crown Heights is home to multiple institutions dedicated to merging culture and community. This year, BEAT Opening Night returns to Brooklyn Museum, the borough’s largest cultural institution, which provides world-class international art exhibits and programming for the Brooklyn community. Additionally, we’re proud this year to present performances at Weeksville Heritage Center, which preserves the history of one of America’s first free black communities while presenting cutting-edge modern programming, and FiveMyles, a gallery which has been embraced by the area’s Afro-Caribbean community for presenting art rooted in non-Western cultures and being a welcome space for both impromptu and planned performances.

Performances

Downtown Brooklyn

Multiple locations

MT2

About the Area

One of Brooklyn’s most dynamic and evolving communities, the civic center of the borough will host an array of performances in this year’s festival. Free lunchtime performances featuring comedy, dance, opera and theater will take place at MetroTech Commons, in the lobby of 1 MetroTech, and in the rotunda at Brooklyn Borough Hall. Additionally, Kumble Theater at LIU Brooklyn will host a night of Brooklyn-based stand-up curated by former BK Live host and comedian Robin Cloud.

Performances

Prospect Park

RS1713_075-lpr

About the Area

Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux in the mid-nineteenth century, Prospect Park is one of Brooklyn’s most treasured destinations and a national landmark. It is maintained by the Prospect Park Alliance, a nonprofit organization founded in 1987 to restore and maintain Prospect Park after a long period of steady deterioration and decline. They preserve the natural environment, restore historic design and provide public programs and amenities for the Park, which receives more than 10 million visits each year.

Performances

Sunset Park

Industry City and in and around Sunset Park

About the Area

The western Brooklyn neighborhood of Sunset Park is currently undergoing a time of profound change. Traditionally a Chinese and Latino community, many of its large waterfront warehouses have been converted into workspaces and incubators for creative entrepreneurs, including Industry City. In Ocaso, BEAT has curated a show with Chinese opera, salsa dancing and experimental theater to reflect both the traditional art forms of the neighborhood’s inhabitants and the spirit of the creative class who have embraced Sunset Park as their own. And in Sunset Park Portraits, Rasu Jilani gathers stories and captures portraits from local Sunset Park storytellers.

Performances

Williamsburg

Glasshouse Project

About the Area

The north Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg hosts a broad mix of venues that produce and present contemporary visual arts, performing arts, and music while rubbing elbows with organizations and landmarks representing the European, Latino, and Jewish communities, amongst others, which have long called the neighborhood their home. This year, we’re proud to present at Glasshouse Project, an art-life-lab dedicated to hosting artistic practices based on performance, participation and time-based art in the domestic sphere under the motto that “art should be experienced in a place that allows staying.”

Performances